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Splice Wires Easily with this Connector

  • Comments 23

 SliceLine Connectors

It drives me crazy when I go to replace an outlet or switch and the wires are too short. I've run into wires so short I could barely pull the outlet far enough from the box to loosen the terminal screws. I used to fix the problem by splicing on a piece of wire with a conventional twist-on wire connector. But it's tough to get them on in such a small space. Plus, even though the National Electrical Code doesn't require you to add these additional connectors when you calculate the required box size, the twist-on connectors do take up a lot of space. Now when I run into this problem, I use a new product from Ideal called SpliceLine. It's a handy wire connector that only requires you to strip the ends of the wires and push them into each end. SpliceLine connectors are easier to install than traditional twist-on connectors and leave you with a much neater wiring job. The SpliceLine connectors work on 12- to 20-gauge solid wire and 12- to 16-gauge stranded wire. A pack of 10 costs about $2.50. Search online for "spliceline" or check your local full-service hardware store or home center.

 

To learn more about the following topics, check out these articles on our site:

Repair Electrical Outlets: Fix Loose Outlets

— Calculate the required electrical box size... What You Should Do with Crowded Electrical Boxes

 

— Jeff Gorton, Associate Editor

 

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  • Comments
    • by posted on

      What a great idea. Glad to see the article.

    • by posted on

      That is a great idea!

    • by posted on

      Total Genius.  Now the only question is, do I go back and fix all the %&(*! wire nut extensions I had to do in our home?  ;)

    • by posted on

      Does this meet code?  Available at box stores?

    • by posted on

      I agree that this is a great fix to an annoying/very common problem.  IDEAL makes a similar product but is for wire termination(wire nuts), called "In-Sure™ Push-In Wire Connector".  Some manufactures use these connectors in Recessed Lighting (can lights)which have a built in junction box  I know from experience, that the "In-Sure™ Push-in wire connectors", whether its (2)ports, stacked (6)ports which = 2 rows, 3 top ports

    • by posted on

      I agree that this could be a great fix to an annoying/very common problem.  IDEAL makes a similar product but is for wire termination(wire nuts), called "In-Sure™ Push-In Wire Connector".  Some manufactures use these connectors in Recessed Lighting (can lights)which have a built in junction box  I know from experience, that the "In-Sure™ Push-in wire connectors", whether its (2)ports, stacked (6)ports which = 2 rows, 3 top ports & 3 bottom ports, or (8)ports eventually a wire will come loose from the connector.  Good idea but I would be hesitant to use them until I know that they will hold.  There are numerous electricians (including myself) that prefer and to use wire nuts.  Sure,  "In-Sure™ Push-in wire connectors" are  faster/easier during wiring, but not when you have to go back on a service call to find a wire came loose in the junction box due to the connector.  I have been on service calls that I did not wire the building just to find that another one of these connectors had failed.  BKINVA great question.......does it meet code????  In most areas where I am from it DOES NOT meet code anymore......  Check out the website...follow these directions;

          At the home page >wire termination>push-in connectors   This will bring you to both the "SpliceLine™ In-Line Wire Connectors" & "In-Sure™ Push-In Wire Connectors".

      www.idealindustries.com

      www.idealindustries.com/prodDetail.do

    • by posted on

      I once saw an electrical "connection" done on This Old House-where they were able to connect romex that needed to be lenghtened when relocating wiring. I have an 1800's home-removing a hallway wall-so many in the old houses-to allow the wood stove heat to move out of the livingroom-when I started removing the wall-I saw that new wiring had been installed across the middle of the space-I need it to be up at the ceiling- but don't have enough length to relocate it, and don't want to have to fully replace it if not necessary. Does any one know of this romex connector? Thanks for input

    • by posted on

      My home was built as a spec house, and anything that would cut cost was embraced. Every electrical box has the absolute minimum length of wire that is physically possible. I believe that they wired each outlet and switch, then went to the other end of that cable, braced one foot against a joist, and pulled as hard as they could. The Romex in my attic is stretched as tight as a banjo string. They must have saved at least $1.29 in copper by doing it that way. Grrrrr!

    • by posted on

      can I connect them to wires then unconnect them to change out an outlet and reuse them?

    • by posted on

      can I use them to connect to a switch or outlet?  and then reuse if I need to change it out?

    • by posted on

      RE:handy-andy

      can I connect them to wires then unconnect them to change out an outlet and reuse them?

      can I use them to connect to a switch or outlet?  and then reuse if I need to change it out?

      I assume you are wanting to do this to make it easier to change out a device?  (device=receptacle or switch)

      I will say that yes you could potentially use them for this purpose but if you change out the switch/outlet numerous times or after repetition you will simply weaken the integrity of the connectors and eventually it will not hold any wires over time.  I would not recommend using them for what you are asking.  So many fires are caused by bad electrical connections.  Also switches and receptacles both have "punch holes" in the back that are intended for the SOLID ONLY  #14AWG or #12AWG to be inserted (#12 AWG is only compatible for switches) outlets will only allow #14 AWG SOLID wire to be "stabbed-in" the back.(I am speaking in general, residential 15amp devices)  That being said I would not recommend, or let me re-state I do not use this method.  I suggest you strip the wire, create a curl(hook) at the stripped end and wrap the wire around the appropriate screws for both outlets and switches. This (in my opinion) is a much safer and better connection, due to the fact that "stabbing the wires" in the back of a device (outlet or switch) I have seen come loose, on the flip side they can be very stubborn to pull the wires out if you need to replace the device.  Yes I realize I said they come loose but can be very stubborn to remove, the statement contradicts itself but its true.  Some will come loose and never hold and some devices will never let loose.

    • by posted on

      RE: PATC

      Have you identified what the wire is?  Is it power to an outlet?  A traveler for a 3 or 4way switch? Home-run? (supplies power from the panel to a switch or an outlet to create a circuit)

      They do make connectors that are used for NM-B (romex) but if you use these connectors and then cover your connection up with Sheetrock and the connection fails it is extremely, extremely difficult to find the source of the problem.  Especially if you no longer live there, no one would ever know the spliced wire was in the wall cavity or where to begin trouble shooting.  (plus this is against code, any connection MUST be made in an accessible electrical box and covered with a plate, not in a box then covered with Sheetrock)  Also I am speaking in generalities, I do not know where you live, what codes are applicable or even know exactly the situation you currently are wiring.

      I would never recommend an "in line splice"  if it is applicable for your situation I would make either a junction box in the wall that connects the wires and run a new wire to the attic where you said  "I need it to be up at the ceiling- but don't have enough length to relocate it"   or from what I can tell its a hallway?  If so, can you  make it an outlet(this can be a junction box) and then run the wire to the ceiling/attic or where ever you need it to be?  hope this helps.  I would encourage a junction box instead of the connectors you are thinking of.

    • by posted on

      To all you "Drugstore" code experts, this is just an article informing you of a new product on the market.

      This should not be a code use forum.    I'm sure the manufacturer's cut sheet gave you the correct usage information.

      The local code jurisdiction will have final authority on the product's use if you care to ask.

    • by posted on

      great product.  thanks

    • by posted on

      "AndyGump

      posted on

      02-15-2011 6:48 PM

      To all you "Drugstore" code experts, this is just an article informing you of a new product on the market.

      This should not be a code use forum.    I'm sure the manufacturer's cut sheet gave you the correct usage information.

      The local code jurisdiction will have final authority on the product's use if you care to ask."

      ANDYCHUMP........................BEFORE YOU COMMENT YOU SHOULD READ THE ENTIRE POST.  Particlulary where it states I DO NOT KNOW WHERE YOU LIVE and I AM SPEAKING IN GENERALITIES.

      So for all of you that do not have a "local code jurisdiction will have to contact  ANDYCHUMP ............

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